Decorating with Science

savvyhousekeeping decorating with science
Painter Sean Scherer is copying me! Well, anyway, I thought I was the only person who likes decorating with anatomical models and other science-related things, but judging from the slide show of his house on the NYTimes website, he is drawn to the same thing.
Decorating with science-related objects is not for everyone. While I might look at an animal skeleton and find it wondrous, another person would be justified to find it creepy. I can understand that. My husband and I have been looking for an antique anatomical chart for awhile now, but most of them are too gory for us. Because of this, we haven’t found the right one to hang in our house yet.
But at the least, science is always interesting, and it’s a great way to add interest to your decor. For example, you could use:
savvyhousekeeping decorating with science
Anatomical models. As the above picture from Scherer’s house shows, displaying a model like these anatomical hearts as sculpture invites interest and has a nice metaphorical punch. (Keeping a heart in a glass case, putting it on a stand for all to see and handle, etc.) The above is $46.50 from Wisdom King.
savvyhousekeeping decorating with science
There are also anatomical charts. Personally, I prefer the hand-drawn antique charts because they often have character and inaccuracies. But if you want a modern one, there are plenty of cool charts available online from places like here and here. They range from $15-$20, and you can even choose to have them laminated.
savvyhousekeeping decorating with science
While I find it morbid to have human skeletons around, animal skeletons are often amazing in their delicacy and intricacy. Someday, I will get around to purchasing a bat skeleton like the above, which costs $55.
savvyhousekeeping decorating with science
Finally, antique medical supplies are very collectible, and when you look at things like this French antique dental model from the 1920s, it’s easy to tell why. These things are weird, archaic and completely fascinating. To learn more about collecting antique medical instruments, click here.

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2 thoughts on “Decorating with Science”

  1. Decorating with animal skeltons/parts thrills me to no end. Hubby and I spend a lot of time hiking in the summer, looking for shed antlers, , bones from winter kills, and feathers. It’s amazing what can be found way out in the middle of nowhere. The only catch is we can’t always identify the animal it is from…*shrugs* not a huge deal. Also, because we love these types of things, we made friends with a few of the local taxidermists…sometimes you can get great deals on skulls, claws and hides when people don’t return to get what they drop off…the greatest thing I ever got was a wolf skull. It was given to me on my birthday. The only way it could have been better is if it had been cleaned. However, the fellow gave it to me just after he skinned it out to do a head mount for a client. Client didn’t want the skull, so the taxidermist thought of me. LOL!
    Yeah, I get weird presents sometimes. 🙂

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  2. I found this via Pinterest. I, too, thought I was the only one who decorated with anatomical models. I particularly love old pharmaceutical models that are advertisements for drugs. Brains are my favorites!

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